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Four Things Writers Can Learn From Fairy Tales (Besides Never Eat The Free Apple) - Writer’s Relief Blog
Everyone has a favorite fairy tale. Who could resist a story with a winning hero, a dastardly villain, and everything turning out for the best at the end? But fairy tales are more than simple stories with pat conclusions. There are some very good reasons why these bedtime stories are enduring classics. Here are four fundamental elements found in every time-tested fairy tale that can help you create your own unforgettable stories.

Four Things Writers Can Learn From Fairy Tales (Besides Never Eat The Free Apple) - Writer’s Relief Blog

Everyone has a favorite fairy tale. Who could resist a story with a winning hero, a dastardly villain, and everything turning out for the best at the end? But fairy tales are more than simple stories with pat conclusions. There are some very good reasons why these bedtime stories are enduring classics. Here are four fundamental elements found in every time-tested fairy tale that can help you create your own unforgettable stories.

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amandaonwriting:

The 21 Key Traits of Best-Selling Fiction
Utility (writing about things that people will use in their lives)
Information (facts people must have to place your writing in context)
Substance (the relative value or weight in any piece of writing)
Focus (the power to bring an issue into clear view)
Logic (a coherent system for making your points)
A sense of connection (the stupid power of personal involvement)
A compelling style (writing in a way that engages)
A sense of humor (wit or at least irony)
Simplicity (clarity and focus on a single idea)
Entertainment (the power to get people to enjoy what you write)
A fast pace (the ability to make your writing feel like a quick read)
Imagery (the power to create pictures with words)
Creativity (the ability to invent)
Excitement (writing with energy that infects a reader with your own enthusiasm)
Comfort (writing that imparts a sense of well-being)
Happiness (writing that gives joy)
Truth (or at least fairness)
Writing that provokes (writing to make people think or act)
Active, memorable writing (the poetry in your prose)
A sense of Wow! (the wonder your writing imparts on a reader)
Transcendence (writing that elevates with its heroism, justice, beauty, honor)
To sell your fiction, you must pay attention to the Key Traits of Best-Selling Fiction. FYI, the twenty-one traits are arranged in a kind of rough order.
Appeals to the intellect. The first five: utility to logic. To you, the writer, they refer to how you research, organize, and structure your story. These are the large-scale mechanics of a novel.
Appeals to the emotions. From a sense of connection to excitement. These are the ways you engage a reader to create buzz. Do these things right, and people will talk about your novel, selling it to others.
Appeals to the soul.Comfort through transcendence. With these traits you examine whether your writing matters, whether it lasts, whether it elevates you to the next level as a novelist.
The 21 key traits of best-selling fiction are excerpted from The Writer’s Little Helper by James V. Smith, Jr.
Source: Writer’s Digest

amandaonwriting:

The 21 Key Traits of Best-Selling Fiction

  1. Utility (writing about things that people will use in their lives)
  2. Information (facts people must have to place your writing in context)
  3. Substance (the relative value or weight in any piece of writing)
  4. Focus (the power to bring an issue into clear view)
  5. Logic (a coherent system for making your points)
  6. A sense of connection (the stupid power of personal involvement)
  7. A compelling style (writing in a way that engages)
  8. A sense of humor (wit or at least irony)
  9. Simplicity (clarity and focus on a single idea)
  10. Entertainment (the power to get people to enjoy what you write)
  11. A fast pace (the ability to make your writing feel like a quick read)
  12. Imagery (the power to create pictures with words)
  13. Creativity (the ability to invent)
  14. Excitement (writing with energy that infects a reader with your own enthusiasm)
  15. Comfort (writing that imparts a sense of well-being)
  16. Happiness (writing that gives joy)
  17. Truth (or at least fairness)
  18. Writing that provokes (writing to make people think or act)
  19. Active, memorable writing (the poetry in your prose)
  20. A sense of Wow! (the wonder your writing imparts on a reader)
  21. Transcendence (writing that elevates with its heroism, justice, beauty, honor)

To sell your fiction, you must pay attention to the Key Traits of Best-Selling Fiction. FYI, the twenty-one traits are arranged in a kind of rough order.

  • Appeals to the intellect. The first five: utility to logic. To you, the writer, they refer to how you research, organize, and structure your story. These are the large-scale mechanics of a novel.
  • Appeals to the emotions. From a sense of connection to excitement. These are the ways you engage a reader to create buzz. Do these things right, and people will talk about your novel, selling it to others.
  • Appeals to the soul.Comfort through transcendence. With these traits you examine whether your writing matters, whether it lasts, whether it elevates you to the next level as a novelist.
The 21 key traits of best-selling fiction are excerpted from The Writer’s Little Helper by James V. Smith, Jr.

Source: Writer’s Digest

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pagalini:

the third in a series of presentations I did about Creative Writing for students in my school who were interested in it (I’m in the business, so I was asked to talk about the things I’ve learned since my work was noticed). 

I’m willing to send my presentations to those who want them :) apart from this I did one on creative writing in general and one on character crafting. 

I’m also willing to answer questions about what it’s like to work with an editor and what kind of things will be asked of you.   ^____^

(via writingfrenzies)

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