Writer's Relief, Inc.

Posts tagged new writers

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7 Ways to Expertly Edit Your Own Writing - Helping Writers Become Authors

Writing can (and should!) be a creative, uplifting, enjoyable process. However, once the initial writing is complete, the next step is editing your draft. And figuring out how to edit your own writing is usually where the writing process becomes less “fun” and more—let’s be honest—agonizing.

How so? Overly critical authors will be convinced their well-written work is terrible. Meanwhile, overly confident writers will be certain even their least thought-out work is sheer perfection. So how can you effectively edit your own writing?

Here are seven tips to help you objectively improve and edit your own writing.

Filed under writing tag Writer's Relief writing writers writing tips tips for writers writing advice advice for writers writing help writing resources resources for writers editing editing tips new writers revisions revising

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bookgeekconfessions:

I wanted to double check that “The Cherry on Top” was a short novel or novella and I found this on uphillwriting.org. I think it’s very informative and hopefully you guys will find it useful!

(Source: uphillwriting.org)

Filed under Writer's Relief writing writers authors books short stories essays fiction nonfiction novels word count writing tips tips for writers writing advice advice for writers writing resources resources for writers new writers writing help

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Lit Mag Spotlight: Nimrod International Journal
It’s the last full month of summer, and we’re shining our Lit Mag Spotlight on the renowned Nimrod International Journal. Run out of the University of Tulsa and in print since 1956 (!!), Nimrod aims to publish new and well-known writers alike from all walks of life and all corners of the globe. Read a little about their mission, what makes them cringe, and why you should subscribe (or keep subscribing)! Enjoy!

CONTEST: Comment on the blog post (link above) by September 3 to enter to win a one-year subscription to Nimrod!

Lit Mag Spotlight: Nimrod International Journal

It’s the last full month of summer, and we’re shining our Lit Mag Spotlight on the renowned Nimrod International Journal. Run out of the University of Tulsa and in print since 1956 (!!), Nimrod aims to publish new and well-known writers alike from all walks of life and all corners of the globe. Read a little about their mission, what makes them cringe, and why you should subscribe (or keep subscribing)! Enjoy!

CONTEST: Comment on the blog post (link above) by September 3 to enter to win a one-year subscription to Nimrod!

Filed under contest Writer's Relief writing writers poetry fiction short stories nonfiction creative nonfiction essays literary journals lit mag literary magazines publishing tips new writers publishing

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15 Tips for Writers: Electronic Submissions (E-Subs) And Submission Managers - Writer's Relief, Inc.

Using an online submission form (or submission manager) can be a very effective way to submit your short stories, personal essays, and poetry to literary journals and magazines. Although most literary agencies are not currently using submission managers, some do require writers to fill out online forms. Submitting online saves postage and time, and it’s easier to track your electronic submissions (e-subs) than traditional print submissions. At Writer’s Relief we’ve learned a few tricks over the years, and we’re happy to pass along these tips for making effective electronic submissions.

(Hint: Watch our video that demonstrates how to use an online submission manager!)

Filed under writers Writer's Relief writing writing tips tips for writers writing advice advice for writers writing help submission managers submission tips calls for submissions submittable literary journals literary magazines lit mag online journals literary agencies literary agent new writers

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Good Writing That Doesn’t Get Published: 5 Problems That Sabotage Your Efforts
Many times, writers come to us scratching their heads, wondering why their good writing isn’t getting published. If the writing in question truly is as competent as the author believes it to be, then the work isn’t the problem. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a problem elsewhere—or a solution. Here are five common problems that can sabotage your success rate, and the best ways to improve your odds of getting a positive response.

Good Writing That Doesn’t Get Published: 5 Problems That Sabotage Your Efforts

Many times, writers come to us scratching their heads, wondering why their good writing isn’t getting published. If the writing in question truly is as competent as the author believes it to be, then the work isn’t the problem. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a problem elsewhere—or a solution. Here are five common problems that can sabotage your success rate, and the best ways to improve your odds of getting a positive response.

Filed under writing Writer's Relief writers writing tips tips for writers writing advice advice for writers writing help new writers publishing publishing tips publishing trends get published am writing keep writing authors poets

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Top Reasons To Query Literary Agents Before Moving On To "Plan B" - Writer's Relief, Inc.

There are many paths to publishing these days—through online E-presses, self-publishing, print on demand, and independent or university-affiliated publishing houses. But most of the writers who come to Writer’s Relief dream of being among the small percentage of authors who publish their book with traditional publishing houses, like Penguin, Random House, or Hachette. We are often asked “Why does Writer’s Relief query literary agents before publishing houses?

To get the answer, we first have to offer a quick overview of agent-editor relationships.

Filed under writing Writer's Relief writers authors books publishing writing tips tips for writers author tips tips for authors writing advice advice for writers publishing industry literary agencies literary agent new writers query letters querying

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“Show, Don’t Tell”—How To Get It Right
Ah, “Show, don’t tell”—the words conjure up memories of red ink on high school English papers. But for many writers, knowing how to “show” and not “tell” is just as tricky now as it was in freshman year. So, what does it mean exactly?
Academic and technical writers are faced with the task of spelling things out for their audience; their job is to present information as clearly as possible. Their writing is all “tell” and no “show.” But as a creative writer, if you offer nothing but plain and factual details, you’re going to bore readers. Your job is to entertain, to elicit emotion, to activate the right sides of readers’ brains. And this is where showing, rather than telling, comes into play.
In creative writing, to “show” is to present a character trait, plot point, or aspect of setting through thoughts, senses, actions, metaphors, or another literary device. In other words, you don’t want to  tell the reader that a character is a certain way; rather, you want to provide clues for the reader to deduce it on his or her own.

“Show, Don’t Tell”—How To Get It Right

Ah, “Show, don’t tell”—the words conjure up memories of red ink on high school English papers. But for many writers, knowing how to “show” and not “tell” is just as tricky now as it was in freshman year. So, what does it mean exactly?

Academic and technical writers are faced with the task of spelling things out for their audience; their job is to present information as clearly as possible. Their writing is all “tell” and no “show.” But as a creative writer, if you offer nothing but plain and factual details, you’re going to bore readers. Your job is to entertain, to elicit emotion, to activate the right sides of readers’ brains. And this is where showing, rather than telling, comes into play.

In creative writing, to “show” is to present a character trait, plot point, or aspect of setting through thoughts, senses, actions, metaphors, or another literary device. In other words, you don’t want to tell the reader that a character is a certain way; rather, you want to provide clues for the reader to deduce it on his or her own.

Filed under writing Writer's Relief writers writing tips tips for writers writing advice advice for writers writing help new writers author tips tips for authors

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The Writer’s Relief Review Board is OPEN! (Deadline: TODAY! JUNE 12TH)

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Writer’s Relief is an author’s submission service (not a literary agency, publisher, or publicity firm). We help creative writers get published by targeting their poems, essays, short stories, and books to the best-suited literary agents or editors of literary journals.

We can help you get published. We will:

  • Identify the best literary agents for your book manuscript. Literary agents are key to publishing your novel, memoir, or nonfiction book.
  • Identify the best literary journals for your poetry, short story, or personal essay.
  • Create your cover or query letters.
  • Proofread and format your submissions.
  • Develop strategies that get literary agents and editors excited about your writing.
  • Make more time for you to write without sacrificing the quality and efficiency of your submissions.
  • Help you get published more often in reputable markets.

Send Us Your Best Work Now!

Submit Here: http://www.writersrelief.com/review_board/

Submission Guidelines: http://www.writersrelief.com/submission-guidelines-for-review-board/

Review Board FAQ: http://www.writersrelief.com/submission-guidelines-for-review-board/#reviewboardfaqs

(For more information about Writer’s Relief, visit www.writersrelief.com)

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3 Quick Cures For Writer's Block

Sooner or later, every writer comes down with a case of the blahs. Whether it’s just a touch of writing feverishly or a full-blown rash of rejection letters, you — and your writing — both suffer. Fortunately, for the most commonly diagnosed writing ailments, there are quick cures to combat what ails you.

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