Writer's Relief, Inc.

Posts tagged Writing tips

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Three Essential Semicolon Rules - Writer's Relief, Inc.

Many people consider semicolons to be the most confusing of the punctuation marks. These people generally fall into two camps: those who liberally pepper their page with semicolons, and those who never use them for fear of using them incorrectly. However, as with the other marks of punctuation, using semicolons is not difficult if you keep some basic rules in mind.

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It’s Time! How To Stop Revising And Start Making Submissions
You’ve revised, tweaked, and touched-up the piece you’re writing. But how do you know when your work is finally finished and ready to be submitted? Does it take one draft…or three…or ten? Too often in their quest to create the perfect story, essay, poem, or book, writers ruin the spirit of their piece by overworking and overthinking every detail. Or, paralyzed by indecision, they never submit their writing out of fear that it’s just not “good enough.” When is it time to let go?

It’s Time! How To Stop Revising And Start Making Submissions

You’ve revised, tweaked, and touched-up the piece you’re writing. But how do you know when your work is finally finished and ready to be submitted? Does it take one draft…or three…or ten? Too often in their quest to create the perfect story, essay, poem, or book, writers ruin the spirit of their piece by overworking and overthinking every detail. Or, paralyzed by indecision, they never submit their writing out of fear that it’s just not “good enough.” When is it time to let go?

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Top Reasons To Query Literary Agents Before Moving On To "Plan B" - Writer's Relief, Inc.

There are many paths to publishing these days—through online E-presses, self-publishing, print on demand, and independent or university-affiliated publishing houses. But most of the writers who come to Writer’s Relief dream of being among the small percentage of authors who publish their book with traditional publishing houses, like Penguin, Random House, or Hachette. We are often asked “Why does Writer’s Relief query literary agents before publishing houses?

To get the answer, we first have to offer a quick overview of agent-editor relationships.

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“Show, Don’t Tell”—How To Get It Right
Ah, “Show, don’t tell”—the words conjure up memories of red ink on high school English papers. But for many writers, knowing how to “show” and not “tell” is just as tricky now as it was in freshman year. So, what does it mean exactly?
Academic and technical writers are faced with the task of spelling things out for their audience; their job is to present information as clearly as possible. Their writing is all “tell” and no “show.” But as a creative writer, if you offer nothing but plain and factual details, you’re going to bore readers. Your job is to entertain, to elicit emotion, to activate the right sides of readers’ brains. And this is where showing, rather than telling, comes into play.
In creative writing, to “show” is to present a character trait, plot point, or aspect of setting through thoughts, senses, actions, metaphors, or another literary device. In other words, you don’t want to  tell the reader that a character is a certain way; rather, you want to provide clues for the reader to deduce it on his or her own.

“Show, Don’t Tell”—How To Get It Right

Ah, “Show, don’t tell”—the words conjure up memories of red ink on high school English papers. But for many writers, knowing how to “show” and not “tell” is just as tricky now as it was in freshman year. So, what does it mean exactly?

Academic and technical writers are faced with the task of spelling things out for their audience; their job is to present information as clearly as possible. Their writing is all “tell” and no “show.” But as a creative writer, if you offer nothing but plain and factual details, you’re going to bore readers. Your job is to entertain, to elicit emotion, to activate the right sides of readers’ brains. And this is where showing, rather than telling, comes into play.

In creative writing, to “show” is to present a character trait, plot point, or aspect of setting through thoughts, senses, actions, metaphors, or another literary device. In other words, you don’t want to tell the reader that a character is a certain way; rather, you want to provide clues for the reader to deduce it on his or her own.

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Respect your characters, even the ­minor ones. In art, as in life, everyone is the hero of their own particular story; it is worth thinking about what your minor characters’ stories are, even though they may intersect only slightly with your protagonist’s.
Sarah Waters

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The Key Element To Success Many Writers Avoid - Huffington Post Books/Writer's Relief

We all know that success as a writer depends on: 1) writing something worth reading and 2) getting published. (Thanks, Captain Obvious!) But while most writers have no problem understanding and even embracing the time and effort required to accomplish these two goals, there’s a third, essential element of becoming a successful author that many writers shun: self-promotion.

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Apps For Writers On The Go - Web Design Relief

Author Robert Louis Stevenson once said, “I kept always two books in my pocket, one to read, one to write in.” Lucky for us, we live in an age where we can have our reading and writing materials all in one smaller and more convenient place! If you own a smartphone or tablet, you have options when the urge to create strikes while you’re away from your computer or notebook. Check out this list of great apps for writers that you can start using today!

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characterdesigninspiration:

Quite a few people requested some form of trait/personality generator, and here’s the result!  I wanted to keep it vague enough that the options could work for any universe, be it modern, fantasy, scifi, or anything else, so these are really just the basics. Remember that a character is much more than a list of traits, and this should only be used as a starting point– I tried to include a variety of things, but further development is definitely a must.

Could pair well with the gender and sexuality generator.

To Play: Click and drag each gif, or if that isn’t working/you’re on mobile, just take a screenshot of the whole thing (multiple screenshots may be required if you want more than one trait from each category).

(via writingfrenzies)

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