Writer's Relief, Inc.

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How To Do Research For Historical Fiction: Balancing Fact And Fiction - Writer's Relief, Inc.

When it comes to writing historical fiction, don’t panic at the word research. If you follow popular advice—write what you know—then researching your novel will help you do just that. And if you write what you love, then your research will also be a labor of love. Immerse yourself in the process and bring your novel to life.

First, find a happy medium. Don’t just throw your characters into costumes and alter their speech just a tad, but don’t overwhelm the reader with hundreds of pages of historically accurate detail and end up with more of a nonfiction history text either. Find a good balance. Readers of historical fiction are usually well-informed, and while they don’t want to be bogged down with useless information, they also don’t want to see a Celtic maiden wearing pleather, or a World War I soldier using laser sight.

Secondly, decide how you’re going to approach your project. You can either write your story and then do the research, or you can research your setting and then create the story, depending on how much the story relies on accurate data. For example, if you’re writing about a medieval battle in England, certain details will be crucial to your plot—the landscape, weapons, existing castles and cathedrals—but if your story takes place 200 years ago in a small town you’ve made up, you’ll have a little more leeway (although it will still bother your readers if the small town has an Internet café or a multiplex).

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Can Facebook And Twitter Replace Your Author Website?
As social media becomes increasingly prominent in our lives, some authors may decide to use Facebook or Twitter as their sole means of marketing. But is this shift in strategy beneficial or detrimental to creating an author brand?
While Facebook and Twitter are excellent complements to your author platform, an author website will provide superior marketing capabilities.

Can Facebook And Twitter Replace Your Author Website?

As social media becomes increasingly prominent in our lives, some authors may decide to use Facebook or Twitter as their sole means of marketing. But is this shift in strategy beneficial or detrimental to creating an author brand?

While Facebook and Twitter are excellent complements to your author platform, an author website will provide superior marketing capabilities.

Filed under writing tag Writer's Relief writing writers social media social networking author websites author blog writing tips tips for writers author platform