Writer's Relief, Inc.

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Breaking and entering issues aside, the story of Goldilocks and The Three Bears can teach writers quite a bit about writing descriptive passages in their short stories, essays, novels, and other books. Some readers love long, descriptive passages that linger on every tiny detail of a scene. Others hate description and want snappy dialogue that moves the story along.
Keep in mind that your story is your story; you’ll need to discover the “right” amount of description that works for you personally. Here are our tips for descriptive writing that engages, energizes, and excites.

Breaking and entering issues aside, the story of Goldilocks and The Three Bears can teach writers quite a bit about writing descriptive passages in their short stories, essays, novels, and other books. Some readers love long, descriptive passages that linger on every tiny detail of a scene. Others hate description and want snappy dialogue that moves the story along.

Keep in mind that your story is your story; you’ll need to discover the “right” amount of description that works for you personally. Here are our tips for descriptive writing that engages, energizes, and excites.

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